Now is the right time to become an American Federation of Musicians member. From ragtime to rap, from the early phonograph to today's digital recordings, the AFM has been there for its members. And now there are more benefits available to AFM members than ever before, including a multi-million dollar pension fund, excellent contract protection, instrument and travelers insurance, work referral programs and access to licensed booking agents to keep you working.

As an AFM member, you are part of a membership of more than 80,000 musicians. Experience has proven that collective activity on behalf of individuals with similar interests is the most effective way to achieve a goal. The AFM can negotiate agreements and administer contracts, procure valuable benefits and achieve legislative goals. A single musician has no such power.

The AFM has a proud history of managing change rather than being victimized by it. We find strength in adversity, and when the going gets tough, we get creative - all on your behalf.

Like the industry, the AFM is also changing and evolving, and its policies and programs will move in new directions dictated by its members. As a member, you will determine these directions through your interest and involvement. Your membership card will be your key to participation in governing your union, keeping it responsive to your needs and enabling it to serve you better. To become a member now, visit www.afm.org/join.

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Music Business, Resources, Traveling Musician

Canadian Waivers and Taxation for Foreign Artists

Ignoring the taxation requirements of a foreign country can lead to unforeseen complications, as this letter illustrates:


United States Taxation for Foreign Artists

by Robert Baird, President Baird Artists Management (BAM!) The issue of United States Taxation for foreign artists came up in a recent letter: I have a band that is looking to play a corporate event in the US at the end of June. My accountant just informed me of the Central Withholding Agreement that could […]


Crazy Gigs Can Be Learning Experiences

Thanks for all the e-mails about the memorable, out-of-the-ordinary, and crazy gigs. Many of these events become learning experiences for the musicians involved.


Everything You Need to Know About Tax Numbers

Revenue Canada and the IRS require tax numbers, both from individuals and businesses, for a variety of reasons, make sure you know all of them.


AFM Updates “ Road Gig ” Assistance Policy

If that ever does happen, though, the AFM offers help through “Road Gig,” an AFM policy to assist traveling musicians in the event of contract defaults. But what exactly is Road Gig?


Helpful Resources for Flying with Musical Instruments


Helpful Resources for Flying with Musical Instruments The AFM TEMPO Sourcebook This is the union’s guide to the effective administration of our TEMPO Program. The manual can be found in the Document Library section of the AFM website in the Legislative Office folder. We strongly recommend AFM local officers, boards, regional and player conferences, and TEMPO […]




Get It in Writing

I think the best way to deal with a botched verbal contract is to avoid the whole mess in the first place. Get it in writing. I personally learned this the hard way.


Time to Think About Tax Refunds

It’s a new year and it’s time to start thinking about getting a refund of taxes withheld in a foreign country by filing a nonresident tax return.


AFM Partners with Government and Airlines to Resolve Long Overdue Inconsistent Policies

On December 29, 2014, Department of Transportation (DOT) Secretary Anthony Foxx issued a final rule regarding the carriage of musical instruments onboard US air carriers. The rule was published in the Federal Register January 5, 2015 and is scheduled to go into effect 60 days after publication in the Federal Register, around March 6.


Avoid Border-Crossing Gear Glitches with an ATA Carnet

It’s the stuff of nightmares for the travelling musician: you’re headed out of the country for a big show, your precious instrument in hand, but when you get to the border, you’re gruffly told that you can’t bring your gear across—not without a bunch of hassle and some hefty fees, if at all!








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