Now is the right time to become an American Federation of Musicians member. From ragtime to rap, from the early phonograph to today's digital recordings, the AFM has been there for its members. And now there are more benefits available to AFM members than ever before, including a multi-million dollar pension fund, excellent contract protection, instrument and travelers insurance, work referral programs and access to licensed booking agents to keep you working.

As an AFM member, you are part of a membership of more than 80,000 musicians. Experience has proven that collective activity on behalf of individuals with similar interests is the most effective way to achieve a goal. The AFM can negotiate agreements and administer contracts, procure valuable benefits and achieve legislative goals. A single musician has no such power.

The AFM has a proud history of managing change rather than being victimized by it. We find strength in adversity, and when the going gets tough, we get creative - all on your behalf.

Like the industry, the AFM is also changing and evolving, and its policies and programs will move in new directions dictated by its members. As a member, you will determine these directions through your interest and involvement. Your membership card will be your key to participation in governing your union, keeping it responsive to your needs and enabling it to serve you better. To become a member now, visit www.afm.org/join.

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Vice President from Canada

awillaert

Alan Willaert – AFM Vice President from Canada

    Labour Gears Up for War

    Pour voir cet article en français, cliquez ici.

    When the gavel
    dropped to open the May 14 meeting of the Canada Council of the Canadian Labour
    Congress (CLC), the tone was a mix of elation and trepidation. On the one hand,
    celebration had begun for the 100th anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike,
    an event in history which forever changed the landscape for labour laws across
    the country. But the elation soon diminished, as provincial reports of
    Conservative electoral victories—and the bellwether that lies therein—sets the
    stage for what may become the greatest struggle the labour movement has yet
    seen in this country.

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    The EU Directive on Copyright

    Pour voir cet article en français, cliquez ici.

    I recently attended a briefing sponsored by the
    Canadian Music Publishers Association at the law offices of Cassels Brock. The
    keynote speakers were Erich Carey, vice president and senior counsel at the
    National Music Publishers Association, and John Phelan, director general of the
    International Confederation of Music Publishers.

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    Canadian Office Prepares for Busy Season

    Pour voir cet article en français, cliquez ici.

    As
    we enter the spring and summer seasons, the Canadian Office will be embroiled
    in a plethora of negotiations, both for successor and new agreements. Added to
    that is a very busy conference and convention schedule, beginning with the
    Canadian Labour Conference’s celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the
    Winnipeg General Strike in mid-May. A significant event in Canadian history,
    the six-week action resulted in many labour reforms followed by a golden age of
    prosperity for the labour movement.

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    Married to the Band

    Pour voir cet article en français, cliquez ici.

    Bands break up.
    Even The Beatles were victims of change, whether it’s external, internal, or
    personal.

    When musicians
    get together and form a band in Canada, the least of their worries is the
    myriad of legal implications of being in a Canadian musical group. When
    successful, bands generally stay together longer, but eventually something
    triggers the split of one member or perhaps everyone. Then comes the hard part:
    who owns what?

    Read More

    Changes at the Musicians’ Pension Fund of Canada/CBC Agreement Update

    Pour voir cet article en français, cliquez ici.

    I have been
    advised that long-time employer trustee and chair of the Musicians’ Pension
    Fund of Canada, Stanley J. Shortt, has retired from the board of trustees for
    personal reasons. A former senior executive whose corporate associations had
    included Eaton’s, Simpson’s, HBC, the TSO, and the Toronto Centre for the
    Performing Arts, Shortt was an integral part of the team for almost 30 years
    and was always committed to serve in the best interests of the membership.

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