Now is the right time to become an American Federation of Musicians member. From ragtime to rap, from the early phonograph to today's digital recordings, the AFM has been there for its members. And now there are more benefits available to AFM members than ever before, including a multi-million dollar pension fund, excellent contract protection, instrument and travelers insurance, work referral programs and access to licensed booking agents to keep you working.

As an AFM member, you are part of a membership of more than 80,000 musicians. Experience has proven that collective activity on behalf of individuals with similar interests is the most effective way to achieve a goal. The AFM can negotiate agreements and administer contracts, procure valuable benefits and achieve legislative goals. A single musician has no such power.

The AFM has a proud history of managing change rather than being victimized by it. We find strength in adversity, and when the going gets tough, we get creative - all on your behalf.

Like the industry, the AFM is also changing and evolving, and its policies and programs will move in new directions dictated by its members. As a member, you will determine these directions through your interest and involvement. Your membership card will be your key to participation in governing your union, keeping it responsive to your needs and enabling it to serve you better. To become a member now, visit www.afm.org/join.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE AFM



Home » Recent News » European Union Court Rules in Favor of Equal Treatment for Creators


European Union Court Rules in Favor of Equal Treatment for Creators

  -  

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has issued a ruling ordering European Union countries to treat music creators equally regardless of their nationality, recognizing this as an important milestone in the fight to ensure music fairness.

The ECJ ruling stemmed from a case in Ireland regarding whether US music creators should be paid royalties when their music is played on Irish radio or in places such as restaurants or bars. Some countries deny foreign music creators royalties for the use of their work even though royalties are otherwise paid to artists who are nationals of those countries.

According to a public statement by SoundExchange, the non-profit collective rights management organization that collects and distributes digital performance royalties for sound recordings, the ruling has broad implications for music creators around the world. By adopting the principle of “national treatment”—that a country should provide foreign entities the same benefits and protections as it would its own citizens—the ECJ is setting the stage for all artists to be paid royalties when their music is played on EU radio broadcasts and public performances.

“Today’s decision by the European Court of Justice reflects a growing global recognition that countries should treat all music creators the same, regardless of their nationality. The ECJ reaffirmed equal treatment as a fundamental principle of how nations engage with one another,” said SoundExchange President and CEO Michael Huppe.“We urge EU member states to quickly follow suit so that all musicians and labels, from whatever territory, can be properly respected for the benefits they provide beyond their home country.”

The ruling comes as the United States and United Kingdom undertake negotiations on a post-Brexit trade agreement. A broad spectrum of organizations representing artists, publishers, musicians, and managers have urged negotiators to insist that national treatment be included in the final US-UK trade agreement.

Unfair treatment denies US music creators an estimated $330 million in direct global royalty payments a year.

For more information on the Fair Trade of Music campaign, visit the website at www.fairtradeofmusic.com.







NEWS





https://totoabadi23.com/ abadicash abadislot https://menarampo78.com/ royalbola abadislot abadislot menara368 abadicash vipmaxwin menara368 totoabadi Menara368