Now is the right time to become an American Federation of Musicians member. From ragtime to rap, from the early phonograph to today's digital recordings, the AFM has been there for its members. And now there are more benefits available to AFM members than ever before, including a multi-million dollar pension fund, excellent contract protection, instrument and travelers insurance, work referral programs and access to licensed booking agents to keep you working.

As an AFM member, you are part of a membership of more than 80,000 musicians. Experience has proven that collective activity on behalf of individuals with similar interests is the most effective way to achieve a goal. The AFM can negotiate agreements and administer contracts, procure valuable benefits and achieve legislative goals. A single musician has no such power.

The AFM has a proud history of managing change rather than being victimized by it. We find strength in adversity, and when the going gets tough, we get creative - all on your behalf.

Like the industry, the AFM is also changing and evolving, and its policies and programs will move in new directions dictated by its members. As a member, you will determine these directions through your interest and involvement. Your membership card will be your key to participation in governing your union, keeping it responsive to your needs and enabling it to serve you better. To become a member now, visit www.afm.org/join.

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Home » Recent News » All News » Annapolis Symphony Orchestra Works to Increase Diversity Through Youth Music Program
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Annapolis Symphony Orchestra Works to Increase Diversity Through Youth Music Program

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The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra (ASO) will launch the Annapolis Symphony Academy this fall, providing music instruction and ensemble training for middle and high school students. With a goal that half of enrolled students come from Hispanic and African-American backgrounds, this new initiative will help promote and increase diversity in American orchestras. For half of all enrolled students, all program costs will be funded by scholarships based on financial need.

The orchestra hopes that in the long term, increased access to musical instruction for minority groups will lead to increased diversity on professional orchestra stages and in orchestra audiences. The academy program also meets a local need for more intensive individual instruction in Anne Arundel County, as well as a need to keep students engaged in music throughout their middle and high school years. A generous grant from Jane Campbell-Chambliss and Peter Chambliss will cover the majority of expenses for the first six years.

Aside from individual lessons, students will attend small ensemble coaching, guest artist workshops, ASO concerts, and more. The program will be led by ASO concertmaster Netanel Draiblate of Local 40-543 (Baltimore, MD) and Local 10-208 (Chicago, IL). The majority of instructors will be ASO musicians. Students are auditioning for 20 string spots in the first year; ASO expects to expand the program each subsequent year.







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