Now is the right time to become an American Federation of Musicians member. From ragtime to rap, from the early phonograph to today's digital recordings, the AFM has been there for its members. And now there are more benefits available to AFM members than ever before, including a multi-million dollar pension fund, excellent contract protection, instrument and travelers insurance, work referral programs and access to licensed booking agents to keep you working.

As an AFM member, you are part of a membership of more than 80,000 musicians. Experience has proven that collective activity on behalf of individuals with similar interests is the most effective way to achieve a goal. The AFM can negotiate agreements and administer contracts, procure valuable benefits and achieve legislative goals. A single musician has no such power.

The AFM has a proud history of managing change rather than being victimized by it. We find strength in adversity, and when the going gets tough, we get creative - all on your behalf.

Like the industry, the AFM is also changing and evolving, and its policies and programs will move in new directions dictated by its members. As a member, you will determine these directions through your interest and involvement. Your membership card will be your key to participation in governing your union, keeping it responsive to your needs and enabling it to serve you better. To become a member now, visit www.afm.org/join.

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All News, Recent News

Local 374 – Still Serving After 115 Years

Local 374 (Concord, NH) celebrated its 115th year of service at its monthly meeting on May 2, during which the executive board also showcased the original “Certificate of Affiliation” that was drawn up on April 22, 1904.


New Orleans MPTF Holds “Never Too Old” Screening with Union Members

The New Orleans premiere of the recording industry’s Music Performance Trust Fund (MPTF)’s uplifting documentary, Never Too Old, took place April 2, at Harmony House Senior Center in Tremé


Candidates Seeking Election for AFM Office

An important part of each AFM Convention is the nomination and election of international officers who will lead the organization during the next three years.


Recommendations and Resolutions of the IEB for the 101st Convention

In conformity with Article 18, Section 5, and Article 18, Section 4 (d), of the AFM Bylaws, the following are the Recommendations and Resolutions to be presented by the International Executive Board (IEB) to the 101st Convention of the American Federation of Musicians for consideration by the elected delegates.


Victory for Striking Stop & Shop Workers

Twelve days after 31,000 Stop & Shop grocery store workers at 241 locations across New England walked off their jobs in protest of proposed cuts to their health care, pensions, and overtime pay, the company conceded defeat.


Nashville Bids Farewell to One of Music City’s Founders, Harold Bradley

Former Local 257 (Nashville, TN) President and AFM Vice President Harold Bradley passed away January 31 at the age of 93.


2019 Convention General Information

The 101st Convention of the American Federation of Musicians will be held in Las Vegas, Nevada, beginning Monday, June 17, and concluding Thursday, June 20.


Baltimore AFL-CIO Donates Food and Toys for the Holidays

Each holiday season, Baltimore area AFL-CIO unions donate money to buy food and toys for our brothers and sisters who have fallen on hard times. Volunteers from various locals gathered at Baltimore Metropolitan Council December 17 to assemble 230 boxes of food to be distributed to both union and community members who are in need.


“Bohemian Rhapsody” Is Most Streamed Song of the 20th Century

On December 10, “Bohemian Rhapsody” became the most-streamed song of the 20th century. The song, initially released as a single by Queen on October 31, 1975, has seen over 1.6 billion streams globally.


Stradivarius Lost for 35 Years Is Back in Service

In 1980, a Stradivarius violin was stolen right out of the office of Roman Totenberg at the Longy School of Music in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and remained missing for 35 years. In 2015 it was recovered and passed on to his daughters.








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