Now is the right time to become an American Federation of Musicians member. From ragtime to rap, from the early phonograph to today's digital recordings, the AFM has been there for its members. And now there are more benefits available to AFM members than ever before, including a multi-million dollar pension fund, excellent contract protection, instrument and travelers insurance, work referral programs and access to licensed booking agents to keep you working.

As an AFM member, you are part of a membership of more than 80,000 musicians. Experience has proven that collective activity on behalf of individuals with similar interests is the most effective way to achieve a goal. The AFM can negotiate agreements and administer contracts, procure valuable benefits and achieve legislative goals. A single musician has no such power.

The AFM has a proud history of managing change rather than being victimized by it. We find strength in adversity, and when the going gets tough, we get creative - all on your behalf.

Like the industry, the AFM is also changing and evolving, and its policies and programs will move in new directions dictated by its members. As a member, you will determine these directions through your interest and involvement. Your membership card will be your key to participation in governing your union, keeping it responsive to your needs and enabling it to serve you better. To become a member now, visit www.afm.org/join.

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Orchestra News

Orchestra London Musicians Perform Amid Shut-Down

Orchestra London in Ontario has ceased operations for at least the remainder of the 2014-2015 season, yet musicians are working closely with the board of directors to find a way to keep the organization running.


Symphony Musicians of Richmond Foster Positivity and Connection

In the midst of a four-year negotiation, the musicians of the Richmond Symphony (VA), otherwise known as Symphony Musicians of Richmond (SMOR), managed to keep a positive outlook and give back to the community.


Jacksonville Symphony Agrees to New Contract

The Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra (JSO) has ratified a new contract that covers musicians through the 2016/2017 season. Negotiations for the previous contract were difficult, and ended with an 11% salary cut.


BPO Marks Successful Year

Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra (BPO) continued its trend of balanced budgets in FY 2014, thanks in part to a 6.2% increase in ticket sales. Nearly 200,000 people heard BPO perform more than 100 concerts.


The New Symphony Opera or Ballet Integrated Media Agreement

On December 18, 2014, the AFM reached agreement with the Employers’ Electronic Media Association (EMA) for a successor Integrated Media Agreement (IMA) covering symphony, opera, and ballet orchestras working under collective bargaining agreements in the US.


Indianapolis Symphony Continues to Balance Budget

Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra (ISO) achieved its second consecutive surplus, slightly more than $266,000, in fiscal year 2014. Its total revenue was $23.5 million.


Los Angeles Philharmonic Receives $20 Million

The Los Angeles Philharmonic will receive $20 million from technology entrepreneur and philanthropist David Bohnett. The gift is the second largest in the orchestra’s history.


Minnesota Orchestra Announces Small Deficit

The Minnesota Orchestra ended its fiscal year with a deficit of $650,000 on its $29 million budget. This deficit was lower than expected and was welcomed as good news. The orchestra is working to rebuild its financial health following the musician lockout that ended in January 2014.


Detroit Symphony Orchestra Achieves Another Surplus

For the second year in a row, The Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO) ended its fiscal year in the black, with a small surplus of $60,000. Subscription numbers increased across all series, with a total of 13,760 subscriptions sold. Overall ticket sales increased as well, with revenue $200,000 higher than last season.


Cleveland Orchestra in the Black

In fiscal year 2014, The Cleveland Orchestra was in the black for the first time since 2001, with a $1 million surplus on its $47.8 million budget.








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